Target Shooting Bringing Kids Together in Kansas

As we hear about tragic deadly shootings such as the one in Uvalde, Texas, and across the United States, it makes us think about what the future of guns and the public perception of its effect on our youth means for the gun community. However, in Kansas, there has been a growing interest in scholastic target shooting among our youth, showing there is a whole other side to the story.

As we hear about tragic deadly shootings such as the one in Uvalde, Texas, and across the United States, it makes us think about what the future of guns and the public perception of its effect on our youth means for the gun community. However, in Kansas, there has been a growing interest in scholastic target shooting among our youth, showing there is a whole other side to the story. As we hear about tragic deadly shootings such as the one in Uvalde, Texas, and across the United States, it makes us think about what the future of guns and the public perception of its effect on our youth means for the gun community. However, in Kansas, there has been a growing interest in scholastic target shooting among our youth, showing there is a whole other side to the story.

As we hear about tragic deadly shootings such as the one in Uvalde, Texas, and across the United States, it makes us think about what the future of guns and the public perception of its effect on our youth means for the gun community. However, in Kansas, there has been a growing interest in scholastic target shooting among our youth, showing there is a whole other side to the story.

More Good than Bad

What the kids did in Texas was a terrible tragedy, but they're so very rare compared to the number of students who benefit from these kinds of programs.

There is so much good in a program that can bring students and firearms together. With kids being increasingly glued to their screens, it is good to see them taking interest in anything outdoors. To take it a step further, students can benefit from these programs by learning "life-lesson skills" that go beyond what students can learn in a classroom. Instructors teach their students firearms safety and awareness, respect for others and themselves, and the importance of determination, teamwork, and mental torughness.

A Fast-Growing Scholastic Sport

Kansas started high school clay target competitions back in 2016, with 29 schools and 321 shooters. Josh Kroells, the USA Clay Target League state director says the recent spring season saw 108 Kansas high school teams put about 2,200 students out on ranges, busting clay targets with shotguns. Another six Kansas schools, with about 170 shooters, who can be as young as sixth graders, have teams within the Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation. Some teams include students from several schools because not all schools host activities.

Most Kansas teams are started by students, faculty members, or parents. Schools must approve a program before it can be accepted into the USA Clay Target League. Administrative approval allows a team to us the school's name and mascot. School financial support varies greatly but is never enough to cover all costs. Money can also come through team dues, donations, and fundraisers. Clay target team participants are subject to all school sports rules, such as maintaining good academic and attendance records.

To read more about how Kansas has benifited from Scholastic target shooting, read "Clay target shooting brings kids and guns together for good" by Michael Pearce.

21st Dec 2022 Justin Thompson

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