Seasonings & Additives

Seasonings & Additives

Additives are ingredients added to your meat product that do more than just taste enhancement. Some reasons you would want to use additives are for moisture retention, yield enhancement, cure acceleration, and meat binding. Additives are ingredients added to your meat product that do more than just taste enhancement. Some reasons you would want to use additives are for moisture retention, yield enhancement, cure acceleration, and meat binding.

What are Additives?

Additives are ingredients added to your meat product that do more than just taste enhancement. Some reasons you would want to use additives are for moisture retention, yield enhancement, cure acceleration, and meat binding.  

How do Moisture Retaining Additives Work?

Moisture retaining additives include Cold Phosphate, Corn Syrup, Dairy Blend, and Sodium Tripoly Phosphate . The products bond the water with the meat so it stays in the product during the cooking process. This is important with products with low fat content as it gives the meat products more moisture, which then functions as yield enhancers. The more water bound up in the product, the more volume and weight it will yield.

When do you use Cure Accelerators?

Cure accelerators allow for immediate smoking after stuffing. The cure accelerator speeds up the conversion from nitrite to nitric oxide gas. Excalibur Cure Accelerator has minimal effect on taste. Giving meat snacks a tang flavor is Encapsulated Citric Acid. Along with change to taste, this acts as a cure accelerator and pH reducer. This is recommended for the novice meat processor.
For wild game, use Smoked Meat Stabilizer. However, do not use Smoked Meat Stabilizers for a cover pickle because it will gas out and create a dangerous cloud of gas. Do not use with products that use water to assist with mixing. To kill bacteria faster than it can reproduce, mix in the Smoked Meat Stabilizer when making snack sticks or sausage.

What are Liquid Smokes?

Liquid Smokes enhance color during the smoking process. Spraying Liquid Smokes on meat gives it a nice, smoky appearance. Common types of Liquid Smokes include C-10 and Pn-9, which is often used with hams and bacons.

What are Meat Binders?

Common meat binders are Soy Protein, Sure Gel, and Carrot Fiber. Soy Protein Blend and Sure Gel carry protein, leading to more efficient protein extraction. Carrot Fiber absorbs up to 26 times its weight in water. It's also allergen-free, inexpensive, and has little to no affect on taste in your cooked product. Any of these also improve the texture of the finished product.

23rd Aug 2022 Justin

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